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How to Start Your Pax Shawl

Ah, Pax.
Pax, my beloved Tunisian crochet shawlette.

This is my most popular pattern (as much because I’ve priced it to be accessible to anyone wanting to learn Tunisian lace crochet, as because I kept it complication-free purely to keep the pattern simpler for beginners).

Occasionally, I get questions about it, though, and the majority of them are to do with starting out.
Usually, I reply to beginner crocheters’ questions individually, but I thought “How great would it be if I updated Pax with a new photo tutorial?” It is 11 years old at this stage, and could do with sprucing up… so…

If you’ve got a copy of Pax, a crochet hook at the ready, and you’re not sure how to begin, let me help you out.

Today's Yarn, by the way, is Drops Flora.

It's a wool/alpaca blend that I'm currently obsessed with. It's warm, has great stitch definition and a wide range of colourways. 

And my hook, as always is a beechwood KnitPro Symfonie - this one's my trusty 5 mm.

Make Some Chains

OK, so the pattern calls for way more chain stitches than this.
I’ve made 20 chains here to demonstrate the technique, but you will be making way more when you start your own Pax adventure.

4-ply yarn and a 5 mm hook

Have you picked up your copy yet?
Click Here!

The First Stitch.

First things first, we need to take a look at our chains.
We’re going to skip the chain closest to the hook, and work instead into the second chain along.

Find the second chain…
Push hook through top loop of chain
Hook is now completely through loop on second chain

Yarn Over on your hook, and draw that Yarn Over back through the chain.
This will give you two loops on your hook –

  • The loop furthest from the hook head was there already.
  • The loop closest to the hook head is your first Tunisian Simple Stitch.
Yarn over

Draw through chain

The Forward Pass

We then do the same for the next chain along.

Important Note for Beginners: We ONLY skip the very first chain in Tunisian crochet. No other chains are skipped from this point on.

Find the next chain along
Push hook through
Yarn over…
Draw Yarn Over through chain

Every time we repeat this process, we add a loop to the hook.
When we have added ten stitches, we’ll have eleven loops in total (that includes the one that was there from the beginning)

11 loops = 10 stitches

For this tutorial, this completes our “Forward Pass”.

In Tunisian Crochet, we have two “Passes” per row of work.
The “Forward Pass” that we have just completed sees loops being added to the hook.
The “Return Pass” will see us remove stitches as we work until we are back to one loop on the hook.

Between the Forward and Return Passes in Pax we have an extra dance step to do, and it involves the next chain along on our string of chains.

Working the “Base”

I want you to identify the next chain along, work your hook into it, Yarn Over, and draw a final loop onto your hook.
A note on this loop: It is created the exact same way as all the loops before it, but its job is very different. It’s not counted as a stitch because it is, in fact, the base of the column. This will become clear as we work on.

There are now 12 loops on the hook
That’s 1 at the start, 10 Tunisian Simple Stitches, and 1 base loop

The Return Pass

The Return Pass is easily my favourite bit of this whole process.
It require far less concentration and is oddly satisfying.

All you have to do to complete the entire Return Pass is to *Yarn Over on your hook, and draw it through two loops* repeatedly, until you are left with one loop on your hook.

Yarn Over
Drawing through two loops
After the second repeat you start to see the row/colum forming in your hook’s wake


When you’re at that point, you’ve completed your row/column!

Foundation Row/Column complete

As you can make out in the above photo, the row/column we have completed has ten little rung or lines evenly spaced down its length. In the above photo they are vertical, look like little fence posts, and start at my right thumb nail and travel down the fabric to my left thumb nail.

We’re going to use these lines to anchor our second row/column.


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Row/Column 2

Slide hook through the first of these lines, like a bolt locking a door.
We stay on the Right Side of the work for this. There’s no neeed to push through to the Wrong Side at all from hereon in.

Original loop on hook (right) and vertical line (left)

Then, same as before, we simply Yarn Over, and draw the yarn over through the line, giving us two loops on the hook.

Yarn Over
Draw through

Then, we find the next line along, and slide the hook through that.

Next line along

And we do the same thing – Yarn Over, pull through.

Yarn Over
Draw through – 3 loops on hook

Now, it’s just a matter of carrying on down, picking up loops using each of the available lines.

Ten loops added to hook for a total of eleven loops

With the Forward Pass complete, we work The Base into the next chain along:

Hook in next chain along…
Yarn Over
Draw through – 1 more loop added to hook
There are 12 in total now

With that taken care of, we get to do the Return Pass for the row/column.
That’s *Yarn Over, draw through 2 loops* repeatedly until 1 loop is left on hook.

2 rows/columns complete

Row/Column 3

With another whole row/column complete, this is what you’ll be looking at:

3 rows/columns complete

More Rows/Columns

After another few completed rows/columns, you’ll start to notice your dangling chains aren’t so dangly anymore. Each row/column uses up one at its base, and adds some strength to that edge of your shawl and helps ensure the completed shawl blocks into a gentle curve.

6 rows/columns complete

I hope this tutorial helps you get started on your own Pax Adventure!

You can find the pattern (using both UK and US crochet terms) here:

Well done!


And remember, small, independent businesses like mine can only make it work through word of mouth, so leave a review if you liked this pattern, tell a friend if you loved it, and don’t forget to tweet about it too!

Thank you.


Thanks for reading.

And thanks to all my Patreon Supporters, without whom tutorials like this one would not exist:


Join My Patreon Family Here!

Marie Saur, Kathleen Robins, Jolin Lang, Sylvea Allington, Sherry Lynn Cekala, Marion Muir, Gwen Coltrin, Sarah Mcfall, Subethjimbob, Gillian Balharry, Michelle Ganoff, Liz Lowe, Heather Lane, Lisa Walsh, Cecilia M Mencias, Isabeau Suro, Ellen Krawiec, Caragh Barry, Wonne, Woolly Wormhead, Konni Wuppertalerin, Deanna Nielson, Mary A Maddy, Sue Horsburgh, Samantha Locke, Teresa Baker, Thea Hutchings, Mariag, Rachel Moutrie, Kris Park, Susan Baughman, Jill Shanmugasundaram, Sarah Davis, Patricia M Fragaszy, Lisa Hendrick, Fran Oberne, Amanda Blohm, Kate Hulme, Emily Owen, Ann Ryan, Kim Tijerina, Ursula Moertl, Kristin, Seyren, Tanja Osswald, Ursula Mayr, Judy Baldwin, Concetta Phillipps, Liss Allen, Maire, Beate Siefer, Kristen, Edi, Julie Marz, Sammy Campbell, Flootzavut, Kathlyn Smith, Regina Schweinsberg, Lora O’Brien, Anne Johannessen, Cheidner, Jasminetea182, Medora Van Denburgh, Heather Longino, Mary, Annie Wells.


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Every Christmas Eve, without fail… I darn socks

Every Christmas Eve, without fail, I curl up with a glass of wine, a warm and snuggly dog and a pile of socks in need of repair.

It’s a tradition I started about a decade ago that helps centre me before the onslaught of cheery faces and socialising that Christmas Day entails. It’s my self-care ritual before my autistic brain is overcome with the chaos and cameraderie of the season.



My family usually go out for Christmas Eve pints, but they have long learnt that despite my love for them, my socks need my attention that night, so they imbibe without me… and we’re all better for it the next day when I arrive batteries fully charged and able to enjoy the day’s feasting.

This year – as with last year – is to be quite different, however.
My family aren’t off to the pub tonight. And tomorrow, I won’t be joining them in their celebrations.

Despite this, I am clinging to my sock tradition. Somehow, it feels even more important this year.


I’m not sure if I’m deriving comfort from the preservation of this tradition when so many other customs fall necessarily by the wayside, or if repairing that which has been worn away this past year is an act of self-care and regeneration.

Whatever the reason, I examine each patch, I observe its unique shape and then I chose a contrasting yarn to repair it.

The contrast is important to me. What is the point of repairing something only for your hard work to disappear? It took time and effort to get that hole there, and time and skill to repair it. Both are worthy of acknowledgement. So, I use orange yarn on a grey sock, green yarn on a black one. Each repair declares “I made it through, I have the scars to prove it, and I’m wiser for them.”

I know it’s just a sock, but it feels like more than that right now so this evening, I intend to curl up with a glass of wine, a warm and snuggly dog and a pile of socks in need of repair.

I highly recommend it as a Christmas Eve activity, if you’re so inclined.

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Sewing up you Reoite Gloves

Once you have your Reoite Glove panels complete, and the vine details added with either a crochet hook or an embroidery needle, it’s time to sew them up!
This tutorial will take you through the process.

What You Will Need

Panels 1 and 2 are laid out in the image below, as is the afterthought thumb.
I’ll be sewing up a right-handed glove in this tutorial, using the right-handed snow flower panel and my stitch markers set for the thumb on my right hand.

Panel 1, the afterthought thumb, Panel 2, my right hand and a bodkin

Have you picked up your copy yet?
Click Here!

A note on needle choices.

Below, I have a blunt-ended darning needle known as a bodkin. I prefer to use a bodkin for seaming up a piece because the blunt end won’t split a strand of yarn when I’m passing it through the fabric. This gives a neater finish to a piece of crochet.

bodkin!

To Begin

Align the stitch marker on your thumb with the lower stitch marker on Panel 2.
Then, thread your bodkin and pass it through the two marked stitches.
Add a few more stitches to give this join a bit more strength.

align these two markers
bodkin through both marked stitches

This is what we end up with:

thumb tacked to Panel 2

When you sew up the rest of the seam, you get a little thumb flap off the edge of Panel 2, like this:

Once again, add a few extra stitches to the last stitch, then weave the end in on the wrong side of the work.
I like to travel back down along the stitches I have just made:

Adding Panel 1

Now that the thumb has been attached to Panel 2, it’s time to add Panel 1 to the party.

The image below is a little misleading, and I apologise for that. The intention was to ensure you knew how to orientate the panels (with the last row of each panel at the knuckle end of the glove), but I really should have put Panel 1 on the OTHER side, with the thumb itself in the middle.

I’ll fix this when I have another glove made up, but for now, let’s press on!

With the Wrong Sides of panels pressed together, start at the cuff end and seam the thumb side of both panels together up to the lower stitch marker.

seaming…
seaming…
more seaming…

When your seaming reaches the lower stitch marker, work through marked stitch AND the stitch at the point of thumb.

stitch marker marking the point where the thumb is included in the process

I recommend you run a few extra stitches into this spot for neatness and strength. This join is the one that will get the most wear.
Seam up the open portion of thumb to Panel 1.

panels 2 and 1 seamed on thumb side, and thumb and panel 1 open
thumb seamed to panels 1 and 2

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Completing The Thumb

Fold glove in half along completed seam.

fold…
…fooooold…
…folded!

Add a few stitches to top edge of thumb where indicated below:

right there
thumb stitches in place

Those stitches add a bit of a gusset to the thumb and makes the opening fit far better.

Then, carry on seaming Panels 1 and 2 together above thumb.

…last few stitches…
…and done!

Lovely stuff!
Time to weave in your ends, then admire your handy work and get another strand of yarn ready.

Flip your glove like a pancake, attach yarn to cuff end of open seam, and start sewing!

open seam
seaming in progress
seam complete

Once all your ends have been sewn in (or, more likely tucked inside and hidden from view, amirite?) your gloves are ready to be worn and admired by friends and strangers alike!

Well done!

And remember, small, independent businesses like mine can only make it work through word of mouth, so leave a review if you liked this pattern, tell a friend if you loved it, and don’t forget to tweet about it too!

Thank you.


Thanks for reading.

And thanks to all my Patreon Supporters, without whom tutorials like this one would not exist:


Join My Patreon Family Here!

Marie Saur, Kathleen Robins, Jolin Lang, Sylvea Allington, Sherry Lynn Cekala, Marion Muir, Gwen Coltrin, Sarah Mcfall, Subethjimbob, Gillian Balharry, Michelle Ganoff, Liz Lowe, Heather Lane, Lisa Walsh, Cecilia M Mencias, Isabeau Suro, Ellen Krawiec, Caragh Barry, Wonne, Woolly Wormhead, Konni Wuppertalerin, Deanna Nielson, Mary A Maddy, Sue Horsburgh, Samantha Locke, Teresa Baker, Thea Hutchings, Mariag, Rachel Moutrie, Kris Park, Susan Baughman, Jill Shanmugasundaram, Sarah Davis, Patricia M Fragaszy, Lisa Hendrick, Fran Oberne, Amanda Blohm, Kate Hulme, Emily Owen, Ann Ryan, Kim Tijerina, Ursula Moertl, Kristin, Seyren, Tanja Osswald, Ursula Mayr, Judy Baldwin, Concetta Phillipps, Liss Allen, Maire, Beate Siefer, Kristen, Edi, Julie Marz, Sammy Campbell, Flootzavut, Kathlyn Smith, Regina Schweinsberg, Lora O’Brien, Anne Johannessen, Cheidner, Jasminetea182, Medora Van Denburgh, Heather Longino, Mary, Annie Wells.


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Creating Reoite’s vine detail – Binding Off

Click here for a guide to creating the vine detail with a Crochet Hook.
Click here for a guide to creating the vine detail with an Darning Needle.

Using just a bodkin (a blunt darning needle), here’s how you secure your beautiful vine.

Let’s Get Into It!

Whether you made your vine using the crochet or the embroidery methods, you will finish up at this exact point.

With a short strand of yarn left, thread your bodkin.

Ready to secure the vine detail on Reoite Gloves

Have you picked up your copy yet?
Click Here!

Embroiderers:
In the image below, my needle is resting on the spot where I would insert it IF I was making another petal stitch.
DON’T go in there.

DON’T go in here

Instead, lift the last petal made up a little and insert bodkin into the fabric in front of it.

Go in here instead.

From the Wrong Side, pull yarn to tighten loop.


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pull…
PULL…
…and done.

That little stitch will hold the last petal in place without adding any bulk to the end of your vine.
But we now must secure that end on the Wrong Side of the glove so it doesn’t come loose.

weaving your bodkin into the fabric on the wrong side is enough to hold the strand in place

After that, carefully trim the end.

Once all your ends are woven in and your pieces have been gently blocked (if you’re into that sort of thing), it’s time to sew up your panels to complete your gorgeous new gloves!


Thanks for reading.

And thanks to all my Patreon Supporters, without whom tutorials like this one would not exist:



Join My Patreon Family Here!

Marie Saur, Kathleen Robins, Jolin Lang, Sylvea Allington, Sherry Lynn Cekala, Marion Muir, Gwen Coltrin, Sarah Mcfall, Subethjimbob, Gillian Balharry, Michelle Ganoff, Liz Lowe, Heather Lane, Lisa Walsh, Cecilia M Mencias, Isabeau Suro, Ellen Krawiec, Caragh Barry, Wonne, Woolly Wormhead, Konni Wuppertalerin, Deanna Nielson, Mary A Maddy, Sue Horsburgh, Samantha Locke, Teresa Baker, Thea Hutchings, Mariag, Rachel Moutrie, Kris Park, Susan Baughman, Jill Shanmugasundaram, Sarah Davis, Patricia M Fragaszy, Lisa Hendrick, Fran Oberne, Amanda Blohm, Kate Hulme, Emily Owen, Ann Ryan, Kim Tijerina, Ursula Moertl, Kristin, Seyren, Tanja Osswald, Ursula Mayr, Judy Baldwin, Concetta Phillipps, Liss Allen, Maire, Beate Siefer, Kristen, Edi, Julie Marz, Sammy Campbell, Flootzavut, Kathlyn Smith, Regina Schweinsberg, Lora O’Brien, Anne Johannessen, Cheidner, Jasminetea182, Medora Van Denburgh, Heather Longino, Mary, Annie Wells.

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Creating Reoite’s vine detail – Crochet Method

Once you have your Reoite Glove panels complete, there’s one last detail to add before they’re sewn up.
There are two different ways to achieve this lovely petal stitch detail on your own gloves.

If you’re handy with a darning needle, click here for the Embroidery Version.

Using just your crochet hook, here’s how you create this gorgeous, textured vine effect.

First Things First

Here’s what we want to achieve.
You can either work with the same colour yarn as the rest of your glove for a subtle effect, or you can spring for a contrast colour yarn to really show off your new skills. For this tutorial, I’ll be using a contrasting yarn so that you can see exactly what I’m doing at every stage.

Completed Reoite Gloves (left) and a Reoite in progress with contrasting colour vine detail (right)

Have you picked up your copy yet?
Click Here!

So, first, we’re going to need a good, old-fashioned slip knot.
This creates the loop we will put on our hook in a moment.

(If you don’t know how to make a slip knot, click here.)

Slip knot and yarn loop

Insert hook into dead centre of cuff edge of fabric (see pattern for a chart to guide you).
Then add loop to hook while it is still inserted in fabric.

insert hook
add loop

Draw loop through to front of fabric. Don’t worry if your loop is still loose. We’ll fix that next.

draw loop to front

Pull ball end of yarn and the loop on your hook with tighten. Pull gently but firmly until loop is snug (but not tight) on your hook.

pull ball end of yarn
loop is now snug on hook

The First Stitch

From the Right Side of your fabric, press hook through to Wrong Side at the point indicated on the pattern’s chart.

Then Yarn Over from Wrong Side, and draw loop through to Right Side. You’ll have two loops on your hook.

yarn over
draw loop through fabric to right side

Draw loop closest to hook tip through other loop. You’ll be left with one loop on your hook, and a petal stitch in your fabric.

Tip. Crochet loosly. These petal stitches have zero stretch to them, so be sure to add a little slack as you crochet.


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Adding More Petal Stitches

Let’s go through the sequence again…

Find next spot on pattern’s guide
push hook through to wrong side
yarn over
draw loop through fabric to right side
and draw loop closest to hook through other loop

After a few more repeats, this is what it will look like:

four petal stitches complete, and one on the way

Keep working like this, with the pattern guide as reference.

four petal stitches complete, and one on the way

Once you have completed your entire vine, cut the yarn on the Wrong Side of the fabric, then loosen the loop on your hook until the end pops through to the Right Side.

pull…
pull…
…and POP!


For a photo guide on Binding Off, click here.


Thanks for reading.

And thanks to all my Patreon Supporters, without whom tutorials like this one would not exist:



Join My Patreon Family Here!

Marie Saur, Kathleen Robins, Jolin Lang, Sylvea Allington, Sherry Lynn Cekala, Marion Muir, Gwen Coltrin, Sarah Mcfall, Subethjimbob, Gillian Balharry, Michelle Ganoff, Liz Lowe, Heather Lane, Lisa Walsh, Cecilia M Mencias, Isabeau Suro, Ellen Krawiec, Caragh Barry, Wonne, Woolly Wormhead, Konni Wuppertalerin, Deanna Nielson, Mary A Maddy, Sue Horsburgh, Samantha Locke, Teresa Baker, Thea Hutchings, Mariag, Rachel Moutrie, Kris Park, Susan Baughman, Jill Shanmugasundaram, Sarah Davis, Patricia M Fragaszy, Lisa Hendrick, Fran Oberne, Amanda Blohm, Kate Hulme, Emily Owen, Ann Ryan, Kim Tijerina, Ursula Moertl, Kristin, Seyren, Tanja Osswald, Ursula Mayr, Judy Baldwin, Concetta Phillipps, Liss Allen, Maire, Beate Siefer, Kristen, Edi, Julie Marz, Sammy Campbell, Flootzavut, Kathlyn Smith, Regina Schweinsberg, Lora O’Brien, Anne Johannessen, Cheidner, Jasminetea182, Medora Van Denburgh, Heather Longino, Mary, Annie Wells.

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Creating Reoite’s vine detail – Embroidery Method

Once you have your Reoite Glove panels complete, there’s one last detail to add before they’re sewn up.
There are two different ways to achieve this lovely petal stitch detail on your own gloves.

If you’re handy with a crochet slip stitch, click here for the Crochet Hook Version.

Using just a bodkin (a blunt darning needle), here’s how you create this gorgeous, textured vine effect.

First Things First

Here’s what we want to achieve.
You can either work with the same colour yarn as the rest of your glove for a subtle effect, or you can spring for a contrast colour yarn to really show off your new skills. For this tutorial, I’ll be using a contrasting yarn so that you can see exactly what I’m doing at every stage.

Completed Reoite Glove (left) and a Reoite in progress with contrasting colour vine detail (right)

Have you picked up your copy yet?
Click Here!

So, first, thread your bodkin with an armspan of yarn.

While you will need about 3 meters of yarn to complete the entire vine it’s not wise to work with a strand of yarn that length from the beginning. The end will get ragged and tatty, and it will catch on your yarn with every stitch. You’ll end up fighting with it more than embroidering with it. It’s better to cut a length you can easily manage and then secure your end and start with a new strand when you run out.

(This tutorial on Binding off a Petal Stitch will help when you need to bind off)

From Wrong Side to Right Side, insert needle where indicated in pattern (the location of your first stitch changes depending on the size of glove you’ve chocen to do).

Setting up for the first Petal Stitch.

From Right Side to Wrong Side, insert bodkin into same hole you chose to set up stitch.
From Wrong Side to Right Side, come out one square up, and at a diagonal.

draw loop to front

Draw yarn in front of bodkin so it sits between fabric and the bodkin itself.
This creates a loose loop which will become the first “petal stitch” in a moment.

Take tip of bodkin and pull it out of the fabric.
As you pull, you’ll notice the loose loop you created in the last step tighten…

yarn wrapped in front of bodkin
bodkin removed from fabric

…and tighten, until a little petal shape has been created.

pull to tighten loop

first petal now sits on top of fabric

The Second Petal

From the Right Side of your fabric, press bodkin through fabric from within the petal loop.

Pick up yarn again and draw it in front of bodkin so it sits between fabric and the bodkin once more.

yarn wrapped in front of bodkin
Bodkin removed from fabric and loop pulled to tighten

Once loop has been tightened, you’ll see you have a second petal stitch completed.


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Adding More Petal Stitches

Let’s go through the sequence again…

bodkin inserted inside previous petal
and out to Right Side again, according to pattern guide
yarn wrapped in front of bodkin
bodkin pulled through fabric with loop tighening
…tighter…
…and done!

Keep working like this, with the pattern guide as reference.
For a photo guide on finishing off, click here.


Thanks for reading.

And thanks to all my Patreon Supporters, without whom tutorials like this one would not exist:


Join My Patreon Family Here!

Marie Saur, Kathleen Robins, Jolin Lang, Sylvea Allington, Sherry Lynn Cekala, Marion Muir, Gwen Coltrin, Sarah Mcfall, Subethjimbob, Gillian Balharry, Michelle Ganoff, Liz Lowe, Heather Lane, Lisa Walsh, Cecilia M Mencias, Isabeau Suro, Ellen Krawiec, Caragh Barry, Wonne, Woolly Wormhead, Konni Wuppertalerin, Deanna Nielson, Mary A Maddy, Sue Horsburgh, Samantha Locke, Teresa Baker, Thea Hutchings, Mariag, Rachel Moutrie, Kris Park, Susan Baughman, Jill Shanmugasundaram, Sarah Davis, Patricia M Fragaszy, Lisa Hendrick, Fran Oberne, Amanda Blohm, Kate Hulme, Emily Owen, Ann Ryan, Kim Tijerina, Ursula Moertl, Kristin, Seyren, Tanja Osswald, Ursula Mayr, Judy Baldwin, Concetta Phillipps, Liss Allen, Maire, Beate Siefer, Kristen, Edi, Julie Marz, Sammy Campbell, Flootzavut, Kathlyn Smith, Regina Schweinsberg, Lora O’Brien, Anne Johannessen, Cheidner, Jasminetea182, Medora Van Denburgh, Heather Longino, Mary, Annie Wells.


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6 Beginner-Level Tunisian Crochet patterns to get YOU started

a small pink tea cozy cover sits on a small pink one-cup tea pot

The Fasten Off Yarn Along is currently in full swing, and I’m heartened to see how many people are using the event as encouragement to try out a “new-to-them” craft.

I see knitters jump on the crochet band wagon, I see weavers wading through lace knitting, and many people expressing an interest in Tunisian Crochet as their next big adventure.

A Beginner’s Paradise

To help you along your way, I have compiled a list of Tunisian Crochet patterns I’ve designed that I think are perfect for your first forray (or your 5th!) into Tunisian Crochet.

Luckily, ALL of these patterns can be made with a regular length crochet hook, so there’s no need to invest in a long Tunisian-style hook for anything I’m about to show you.

Crocheters, I guarantee you have all the tools you need to hand, and knitters, I bet you have a crochet hook lurking somewhere in the bottom of your stash that you use to pick up dropped stitches.

Ok, so with hook in hand and yarn picked out, let’s dive in!

Hey! Knitters!

The perfect starting point for you is the ever-popular Ishrat Hat.

It starts off with a soothing, and a familiar knitted garter stitch brim to ease you in.
You then add some gorgeous Tunisian Simple Stitch on to it to create the textured crown.
The construction is fun, and the hat itself takes less than a skein of your favourite sock yarn.

The pattern comes with a suite of Helpful Tutorial videos that takes you through the entire process.

All Simple Stitches

Another great first make is the Tea Beanie Tea Cozy.

This pattern is straight up Tunisian Simple Stitch from start to end.
This stitch is the one everyone learns first, so this project is a wonderful opportunity to get the basics down right from the start.

Because of its simple construction, the Tea Beanie is infinitely modifiable to fit your personal tea pot (or your head, if you seam it up entirely! Who doesn’t love wearing a tea cozy on their head, eh?!)

This cozy as written takes about 100 m of worsted weight yarn (or 100m each of fingering weight yarn, doubled for a great stash-busting project) and you could easily get this done in time for Christmas.

Crocheters!

If you know how to make a single crochet (US) stitch or a double crochet (UK) stitch already, then you already KNOW how to do Tunisian Crochet.
Tunisian Simple Stitch uses the exact same dance steps, just in a slightly different order, so crocheters… you got this!

Great beginner patterns include:

Pax

I designed Pax specifically to be a tutorial for beginners, so there are no unwelcome surprises.

I have taught Pax at many yarn festivals over the years, and it has become the introductory pattern for So. Many. People into the wonderful world of Tunisian.

I’ve kept the price super low, too, to ensure it’s accessible to everyone.
The only commitment you need is a little of your time.

Finola

The reviews for Finola are in, and they are glowing!

Finola is made out of a series of wedge shapes, so once you have the first one complete, the rest flow on in a logical pattern.
This one is great for anyone who loves a good jigsaw, as the pieces all fit together in a soothing and satisfying manner. You’ll find yourself saying “I’ll just do one more wedge before bed” more than once!

Finola comes with a suite of How To videos on Instagram. Click here to see them before you buy.

Nuada

Nuada is one of my personal favourites.
It is made in layers, with each layer made out of Tunisian Simple Stitch.

The two main layers contain simple-to-learn lace eyelets.
This shawl is easy to modify, too. You can make it longer by adding more lace repeats, and make it wider by adding more layers to the centre.

Discount Time!

And don’t forget to use your FO2021 discount on these patterns, (and a whole range of other ones, too) before the deadline on the 6th of December.

Happy Crocheting, everyone!


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Creating Reoite’s “Snow Flower” – Part 2

This tutorial will guide you through the Return Pass for the Snow Flower stitch in my Reoite Glove pattern.

Recap

Here’s where we left off in Part 1.

The Forward Pass has been completed and we are ready to work the Return Pass

Have you picked up your copy yet?
Click Here!

Work the Return Pass as usual until there are only two loops left before we reach the stitch marker:

(This will require referencing your copy of Reoite as the number of stitches to be worked will change depending on the glove size and Snow Flower position)

Two loops left on hook before the stitch marker is reached.

Remove the marker.

Then, Yarn Over and draw through 3 loops on hook.
You will work through 2 tight loops and a loose (petal) loop.

Yarn Over in place on hook.
Yarn Over has been drawn through two loops
and the looser (petal) loop.
Note how the first petal has been worked off the hook.

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Make another Yarn Over and draw that through the next two loops and one looser (petal) loop.
Do this repeatedly until all the petals have been removed from hook.

Second Repeat – second petal is off hook
Third Repeat – third petal is off hook
Fourth Repeat – fourth petal is off hook
Fifth Repeat – fifth petal is off hook
Sixth Repeat – sixth petal is off hook

At this point all six petals of the Snow Flower have been worked off the hook, so now, we can complete the Return Pass in the traditional manner i.e.
*Yarn Over, and draw through 2 loops* repeatedly to end of row.

Nicely done!

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Creating Reoite’s “Snow Flower” – Part 1

The “Snow Flower” on my Reoite Mitten pattern is worked as you crochet, rather than being added afterwards.
As such, it’s literally part of the fabric of the glove, making them warmer on your hand and cozier to the touch.

Reoite has 4 Snow Flowers per glove, and here’s how you create this gorgeous, textured effect with some simple loops and regular length crochet hook.

First Things First

There’s some crocheting to be done.

Getting set up to create the first Snow Flower

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Next, we have to locate a spot on the fabric we’ve created..

Three TSS sts in…
…and four rows down.

From the next stitch along, count three stitches in, and then count four rows down. There is a little hole in your fabric on the bottom right of that stitch’s bar.
(It’s on the bottom left for left-handed makers)

The First Petal



Insert your hook into that hole, push through to the back of your fabric and make a Yarn Over.

Hook about the enter fabric
Hook at back of fabric, with Yarn Over added

Draw Yarn Over through to the front of work, and stretch until loop reaches top of fabric.

This is your first Snow Flower petal

Peek behind the petal you have just made and you’ll see the previous row’s TSS bars sitting there.
Insert hook into the next one along:

Hook in next TSS ba along

Yarn Over, and draw through:

Yarn Over
Draw Yarn Over through bar

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Adding More Petals

We will repeat the above dance steps a few times until our flower starts to bloom.

Insert hook into same hole in fabric, Yarn over and draw a second petal loop through to front
Locate next TSS bar on previous row behind petal, insert hook, Yarn Over and draw another loop onto hook

Once you’ve done this repeatedly, you’ll notice that the loops on your hook alternate between a long (petal) loop and a shorter (TSS) loop.

Stop picking up loops when you have 6 petals and 5 TSS loops on your hook.

Pop a latchable stitch marker onto your hook.

Make sure the stitch marker you use is a removable one.

Complete the row as directed in the pattern:
(This varies depending on the position of the Snow Flower, so follow the pattern to be sure).

Forward Pass is complete

For a Photo Tutorial of the Return Pass, click here.

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TSS2tog decrease

It’s hard to imagine, but sometimes, Dear Reader LESS Tunisian Crochet is called for.
And in those moments, knowing how to decrease is a boon.

In my Reoite Gloves, we use decreases to add a little shape to the fabric. This ensures that we have a cuff that sits comfortably on the wider part of the arm, as well as a glove that sits snug at the wrist and knuckles with no room for pesky drafts to sneak in.

Here’s how the TSS2tog (Tunisian Simple Stitch 2 together) is made.


Work the pattern up to the point where you need to make a TSS2tog:

Part of the Forward Pass on this row of Tunisian Simple Stitch is complete.

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Slide your hook through the next TWO bars along:

Two bars on hook

Yarn Over hook:

Yarn Over

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Draw Yarn Over through the two bars on hook:

You have created a TSS2tog stitch by making one loop (on hook) out of two bars (on previous row).

When you complete the rest of the row, you can see a little upsidedown V shape indicating the point you worked the TSS2tog decrease.

The decrease will appear one row LOWER than you may expect. Remember that if you use them to count rows.

Note:
The Return Pass is worked as normal i.e.
Yarn Over, draw through 1 loop to make a chain stitch, then *Yarn Over, draw through 2 loops* repeatedly to end of row.

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Marie Saur, Kathleen Robins, Jolin Lang, Sylvea Allington, Sherry Lynn Cekala, Marion Muir, Gwen Coltrin, Sarah Mcfall, Subethjimbob, Gillian Balharry, Michelle Ganoff, Liz Lowe, Heather Lane, Lisa Walsh, Cecilia M Mencias, Isabeau Suro, Ellen Krawiec, Caragh Barry, Wonne, Woolly Wormhead, Konni Wuppertalerin, Deanna Nielson, Mary A Maddy, Sue Horsburgh, Samantha Locke, Teresa Baker, Thea Hutchings, Mariag, Rachel Moutrie, Kris Park, Susan Baughman, Jill Shanmugasundaram, Sarah Davis, Patricia M Fragaszy, Lisa Hendrick, Fran Oberne, Amanda Blohm, Kate Hulme, Emily Owen, Ann Ryan, Kim Tijerina, Ursula Moertl, Kristin, Seyren, Tanja Osswald, Ursula Mayr, Judy Baldwin, Concetta Phillipps, Liss Allen, Maire, Beate Siefer, Kristen, Edi, Julie Marz, Sammy Campbell, Flootzavut, Kathlyn Smith, Regina Schweinsberg, Lora O’Brien, Anne Johannessen, Cheidner, Jasminetea182, Medora Van Denburgh, Heather Longino, Mary, Annie Wells